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The eMarketing Digest
© 1996 - 2008
Library of Congress
ISSN 1522-6913

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                     The E-Marketing Digest
                      Volume #2, Issue #16
                         May 27, 1997
                     ----------------------
                    Gary K. Foote, Moderator


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Table of Contents

+ New Subjects

    "Spam Therapy"
       - Cole Patterson

    "BCC vs. Mailinglists"
       - Don Morris

    "Porno Spam"
       - Claudia Hafling

    "Filtering E-mail"
       - Claudia Hafling

+ Ongoing

    "Paying for Spam"
       - Alex Ingerman

---------------------------------------------------------------------

                      ---------------------
                          New Subjects
                      ---------------------


From: Cole Patterson 
Subject: SPAM THERAPY

I want to sincerely thank Mr. Foote and the members of this list for
opening my eyes to a new career path. Clearly, there is a large number
of people who have been severely traumatized by what they call "spam." I
had no idea this problem had reached such culture-threatening
proportions. I am therefore developing a new line of psychtherapy,
dedicated to treating those affected in this way and, of course, helping
repentant spam originators along the 12 steps to recovery. Thanks!

[Moderator Reply]

Thanks Cole,

It is a warming feeling to know that we have been instrumental in
providing careers and helping to define a new field of medicine.
Three Cheers for EMD!

;-o


         ***  NEW POST - BCC vs Mailinglist  ***


From: Don Morris 
Subject: Re: BCC vs. Mailinglist

On 5/26/1997 3:35 PM, Gary K. Foote wrote:

>If you use the BCC field you risk the appearance, and perhaps the
>reality, of spam.

Gary, I send out infrequent messages to those people who have emailed me
for help with problems with their laser printers. In the past, I have
used BCC so that the 500 or so recipients would not see the entire
recipient list. I am considering switching to mailing list software --
Macjordomo or LetterRip -- to send the messages, but the To: header will
now read something like  instead of the
recipient's address. Is this just as bad as using BCC?


Don Morris                   |    76145.3115@compuserve.com
OfficeMedic                  |       mrtoner@lasermedic.com
Moreno Valley, CA USA        | Advice: www.pe.net/~mrtoner/
** HP Quick-Reference Service Guide: info@lasermedic.com **

{Moderator Reply]

Don,

As long as your list of e-mail addresses was gathered by your
subscribers opting in, you essentially have a mailing-list that you
operate manually.  In this case you are not spamming by using BCC.
See?  There are always exceptions  :)

Gary K. Foote


                ***  NEW POST - Porno Spam  ***


From: Claudia Hafling  <102440.51@CompuServe.COM>
Subject: Porno Spam

Gary -

I am a subscriber to your e-marketing list.  I just returned from
a five-day vacation and found my e-mail box on CompuServe clogged
with junk like the following.  I am assuming this must be spam.
How can we stop people like this from spamming junk like this and
making it hard on those of us with legitimate and targeted reasons
to communicate with people???

-Claudia L'Engle Hafling
102440.51@Compuserve.com
Media & Marketing Concepts, Inc.
Public Relations, Advertising & Marketing
(800)544-6482

--------------- Forwarded Message ---------------

From: 	INTERNET:beth@callbethnow.com
To: 	Claudia Hafling , 102440,51
Date: 	Thu, May 22, 1997, 8:40 AM

RE: 	Bedtime

Sender: <@>
Received: from localhost.com ([205.243.44.184]) by arl-img-6.compuserve.com
(8.6.10/5.950515)
        id IAA24977; Thu, 22 May 1997 08:24:09 -0400
Message-Id: <199705221224.IAA24977@arl-img-6.compuserve.com>
Date: Thu, 22 May 1997 07:28:10
From: beth@callbethnow.com
To:
Subject: Bedtime


Bedtime Stories...

Barb read about the game in a magazine article. "Spice up Your
Sex Life with Games" was the title of the article...

[moderator snip]

                                 What happens next?

                                          Find out...

 Call  1-664-410-3729  for our FREE recorded sexy messages to you!

***We are most seductive women you will ever hear!
***Just a long distance call!
***No fees!
***No credit cards!
***No passwords!
***No per-minute, or any other surcharge!
***No 900#!


                                  1-664-410-XXXX

    <><>The best sex youve ever had.  Must be over 18.<><>


Sincerely Yours   ;-)
  -- Beth

[[[[Moderator $.02]]]]

Claudia,

What has been sent to you is not just spam, it is mild
pornography that has been transmitted to you over the internet.
This action, unlike spamming, is clearly illegal and prosecutable
under US law.  Personally, I would forward it to US federal
authorities for further investigation.

Gary K. Foote


         ***  NEW POST - Filtering E-mail  ***


From: Claudia Hafling  <102440.51@CompuServe.COM>
Subject: Re: The E-Marketing Digest, V2, #13

In Vol 2, #13, Kathy Burns said:

>AOL actually did something of this sort not even a year ago and
>they were sued over it.  If I remember right it was ruled
>unconstitutional. The courts decided it was ok for each individual
>person to block or not block, and decide who/where/what to block,
>but AOL could not do a mass blockage since it was not technically
>their mail.

I am new to the world of e-mail and did not realize there was any way
for people to block it or filter it.  How is this done?  Do only
people on AOL have this ability?

Sorry to be so ignorant, but I am trying to learn...  Thanks.

--Claudia L'Engle Hafling
Media & Marketing Concepts, Inc.
Full-service public relations, marketing and advertising
102440.51@Compuserve.com
(800)544-6482

[Moderator Reply]

Claudia,

I use Eudora Light 3.0 and there are built in filtering capabilities.
Setting one up is as easy as going to TOOLS==>FILTERS.  Select the
filter criteria and make the appropriate selections for disposition
of the mail in question.

Example:

Header:       Subject
Contains:     E-Marketing Digest
Action:       Transfer
Destination:  E-Marketing Archives

This takes any e-mail with E-Marketing Digest in the subject and
automatically transfers it to a mailbox I have named E-Marketing
Archives.

Other software clients use a variety of methods to filter e-mail.
Anyone care to explain a different package's procedure?

Gary K. Foote

                      ---------------------
                             Ongoing
                      ---------------------


From: Alex Ingerman 
Subject: RE: The Harm of The SPAM

Hi,

This is my first post to the list. My name is Alex Ingerman, and I am the
webmaster/online advertizing manager for Sunscapes Travel, Inc. I will
follow up with more detailed introduction sometime later, but for time
being, I wanted to contribute my $.02 to the thread :-).
>
>So, spam is more ethic problem, this is problem of merchant
>responsibility for advertising and so on. Legislation won't help
>here as legislation cannot make everybody tell true. Thechnical
>solution won't help because spammers will always find some work
>around. The only way to fight against the spam is education.
>It will takes years, but I'm afraid this is all we can do.
>

	True enough. I agree with you on all your points. However, there is
another method of limiting (I said limiting, not shutting down) the problem
of SPAM. It is based on ISPs filtering the outgouing mail.
	Say, I am given a limit of 5000 e-mail messages per day. This is enough
for ANY single individual, IMHO. The isp's SMTP server just trashes all the
messages after 5,000 during a day. Period. IF someone needs more than that
(e.g. people running a newsletter which is mailed to many people), they can
get their quota lifted to a more desirable limit, or removed altogether, as
long as they can show that this is not UCE. OF course, this will require a
detailed definition of UCE, like the one said in this list, but I am sure
that people can agree on one eventually.
	Now, about the cost. I can guarantee, that if enough ISPs showed an
interest in participation, a thousand of free programs that do the job
would appear on the market. Mailserver manufacturers will begin to include
this option in new version of their products. Sure, there will be some ISPs
who are not willing to participate (like AGIS). I hope that they can be
bullied into doing it by the backbone providers (Sprint, MCI, etc), or be
charged higher rates. ISPs that do participate, should make it one of their
advertizing points, so people will want to go with them.
	This WILL NOT solve the global problem. Spammers will move to other ISPs
that did not join the program, most probably to the offshore ones who don't
care about the problem.
	A big question arises: what about those of us who DO send commercial
e-mail as part of advertizing campaign? I believe that if the corporation
is willing to do that, they might be willing to pay for it as well, I am
not talking bug sums. Say, $500 for 100,000 people, IF it exceed my 5,000
per day quota. Small enough for our advertizing budgets to deal with, but
enough to stop the idiots who send out MLM/Get Rich Fast/etc spams. After a
while, it just won't be worth it to them anymore. Also, the ISPS can
automatically add something on their subject lines, for example "AD>", so
we can filter junk effectively.
	If I will know that the commercial e-mail I receive is more or less
targeted (when you pay for it, you want it to be targeted), and mostly
(fully?) legal, I will NOT filter the junk out automatically, because there
might be something of interest to me there. If not, I will trash the
message and forget about it.
	There are probably many flaws in this system. And it does not solve the
problem of spammers frm other countries. However, I believe that as other
countries' internet usage increases, they will start taking similar
measures. Altogether, it is a slow process, but it might just work.

Alex Ingerman
mailto:nwres203@wolfenet.com

My opinions represent those of everyone at Sunscapes
Travel, Inc. Feel free to hold them accountable.


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