Barringer Crater
I.M.C.A #2215

About Meteorites
Dealer Listings, Education, Supplies, Articles and more...

METEORITE SALES

 Aerolite
 Michael Blood
 Dave Carothers
 Chicago Steve
 Catch a Falling Star
 Earth's Memory, The
 Michael Farmer
 Gary Foote
 Ruben Garcia
 Bob Haag
 R. N. Hartman, Inc.
 GI-PO Meteorites
 Greg Hupe
 Impactika
 R. A. Langheinrich
 M come Meteorite
 Meteorite Market
 Meteorite Shop, The
 Mile High Meteorites
 Nakhla Dog
 Jason Phillips
 POLANDMET
 Rocks from Heaven
 Rocks On Fire
 Schooler's Macros
 Science Mall - USA
 Space Treasures
 SV-meteorites
 Spacerocks UK


PRESERVATION OF A 117 G CANYON DIABLO IRON
FROM BARRINGER CRATER, ARIZONA.
 
[ Here is further info on meteorite preservation ]

Canyon Diablo meteorites come from the meteor crater area 40 miles east of Flagstaff Arizona where Barringer Meteor fell. Its structural class is a Coarse octahedrite. Its Widmanstatten bandwidth is 2.0 0.5mm.

This 117 gram sculptural Canyon Diablo Iron was deeply rusted in places and quickly needed some preservations when I got it, so here's what I did. [Before picture above, after picture below]
  1. I used a shallow bowl of rust remover and soaked the specimen in it for a couple of hours. In retrospect I may try the next ruster I end up with overnight in rust remover.
  2. While it was still wet with rust remover I used brass brushes to remove as much of the deep rust as possible. During this process some of 'bluing' was also removed, though the picture below does exaggerate it to some degree. While some may not like this I personally enjoy the contrast more than the completely blued piece. In fact, I am not sure the bluing was original since it came off as easily as it did.
  3. I rinsed and brushed the specimen in a bath of distilled water to stop the rust remover actrion and remove all traces of it.
  4. I soaked the specimen overnight in a bath of 96% alcohol to drive out the water.
  5. I baked it on the oven for about 2 hours at just below 200 degrees to drive out the alcohol and fully dry the specimen. I let it cool to room temperature while it remained in the oven.
  6. Finally, I used a product known to motorcycle riders as 'Chain Wax', a 'fling free' lubricant that coats, but is not oily. I rubbed this wax with a soft cloth and the specimen has been completely stable since August, 2006.


Back to Meteorite Articles

ONSITE RESOURCES
 Meteorite Gallery
 Meteorite Education
 Meteorite Hunting
 Meteors on Video
 Meteorite Articles
 Meteorite Collections
 Preservation

OFFSITE RESOURCES
 Meteorite Times Mag
 Meteoritical Society
 Meteorite Magazine
 Meteor Showers
 Meteorite Glossary
 Earth Impact Database
 Universe Today
 Is it a Meteorite?

SERVICES/SUPPLIES
 Classification Services
 Information Database
 Cutters & Slicers
 Displays & Storage
 Dessicant Paks
 Meteorite Labels

 Homepage